Categories: There are numerous Question Sets from which you can choose.  They fall into three general categories:

  1. Peer — asked for each team member. Responses are compiled anonymously for the student report.
  2. Team — asked once for the entire team. Responses are compiled anonymously for the student report.
  3. Other — asked once for the assessment.  Responses go only to the instructor.

Question Sets: You may include as many Question Sets as you wish. The minimum is one, in only one of the categories. Once you select the Question Sets to include, you can edit the wording of any individual questions.

Need a New Question Set? I am happy to build you a new question set!. Simply send your list of questions, plus an introduction, response scales, and source if known to robanson@peerassessment.com It will be ready within two business days.

Numbering Conventions: Following the Peer, Team, and Other categories,  the question set numbers represent the following: 1-99=General Use, 100-199=Custom Developed, 200-299=Workplace Use

Peer Question Sets

Intro: A positive and successful team experience builds from team members who actively participate and take initiative in the team’s work. Several of these participation behaviors are listed below. Please consider the extent to which this team member Never, Sometimes, or Always does the following…

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • Attends team meetings?
  • Communicates and responds promptly with teammates?
  • Voluntarily takes on his/her share of work assignments?
  • Makes a serious effort to fulfill his/her responsibilities on assignments?
  • Meets agreed deadlines to complete his/her assigned work?
  • Expresses ideas and opinions clearly?
  • Listens and respectfully considers teammates’ ideas and opinions?
  • Helps other team members when they need it?
  • Steps up to help the team plan, coordinate and track its work to meet team goals?

Source: Adapted from a form reprinted in B. J. Millis and P. G. Cottell, Jr., Cooperative Learning in Higher Education Faculty, Oryx, Phoenix, 1998.

Intro: Rate the performance of yourself and each of your team members using the five-point scale below, from ‘Never’ to ‘Always’. Please be conservative using the endpoints ‘1=Never’ and ‘5=Always’. These should only be used if the person in fact Never or Always displays the description as written.

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • Quality of Work — Provides high quality work that does not need to be checked or revised by others to ensure its quality.
  • Research and Information Sharing — Completes research and information gathering, then shares information with the group.
  • Participation — Is consistently focused on the task and what needs to be done for the group.
  • Self-Directed — Is motivated to contribute, to volunteer for tasks, and to complete their work in a quality and timely manner.
  • Listening and Discussing — Respectfully listens, interacts, cooperates and helps the group come up with positive ideas.
  • Dependability — Turns in all work on time and does not depend on others to do or complete work.

Intro: Using the following 9 point scale, please assign an overall rating of this team member’s participation.

Question: Please rate this team member’s overall participation, effort and contribution, not his/her academic ability.

Scale: 1-9

  1. No show: No participation at all.
  2. Superficial: Practically no participation.
  3. Unsatisfactory: Consistently failed to show up or complete assignments, unprepared.
  4. Deficient: Often failed to show up or complete assignments, rarely prepared.
  5. Marginal: Sometimes failed to show up or complete assignments, rarely prepared.
  6. Ordinary: Often did what he/she was supposed to do, minimally prepared and cooperative.
  7. Satisfactory: Usually did what he/she was supposed to do, acceptably prepared and cooperative.
  8. Very good: Consistently did what he/she was supposed to do, very well prepared and cooperative.
  9. Excellent: Consistently carried more than his/her fair share of the workload.

Source: Adapted from Barbara Oakley, Richard M. Felder, Rebecca Brent, and Imad Elhajj, Turning Student Groups into Effective Teams, 2004, Journal of Student Centered Learning, Vol 2, No. 1, pp. 9-34, New Forums Press, OK. Oakley et al adapted from R. M. Felder & R. Brent, Effective Teaching, North Carolina State University, 2000.

INTRO: Please give specific, constructive feedback to each person on your team, including yourself, regarding how they contribute to and participate with the team.  For each individual, discuss both their strengths and their weaknesses, or areas where they could improve.

Open Ended

  • Please comment on specific areas he/she can improve and areas they are doing very well. Please make your comments constructive, helpful, and specific.

Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Rob Anson, Boise State University.

Instructor Note: You can set the maximum number of points to any level. The respondent will enter a value between 1 and your maximum.

Intro: For each person on the team, including yourself, assess a numerical score on each of the two areas below. Please enter only the numeric score.

Scale: Numeric

  • Participation: (Allocate from 1 to 100 points) This team member was always there helping to move the team forward in terms of playing an active role, helping others, followed through on action items, etc.
  • Contribution: (Allocate from 1 to 100 points) This team member added value to the team deliverables in terms of providing leadership and/or contributing significantly to the creation and quality of team work products.

Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Regis Terpend, Boise State University.

Intro: Rate the performance of yourself and each of your team members using the five-point scale below, from ‘Never’ to ‘Always’. Please be conservative using the endpoints ‘1=Never’ and ‘5=Always’. These should only be used if the person in fact Never or Always displays the description as written.

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • Communication: Willing to talk to proptly respond to classmates and discuss all aspects of the group work including challenges and successes.
  • Reliable: Shows up to scheduled meetings and completes work on time in relation to due dates.
  • Respect: Listens to others ideas and is open to them, taking turns talking and not cutting each other off. Treats people the way you want to be treated.
  • Positive Attitude: Encourages other team members. Doesn’t get down on the group when challenges present themselves. Maturely handles personal conflict.
  • Honesty: Can admit when they need help or do not understand something. Communicates with the team if their portion of the work is not complete. Able to express their real feelings respectfully and maturely during conflict.
  • Team player/takes initiative: Works well with team members. Individual is a team player who is flexible and ready for tasks that are given. Supports the team and takes initiative to help others when needed.
  • Organization/time management: Ability to work and manage time effectively to get task completed on time.
  • Commitment: Dedicated to the group/team and finishes assignments given. Does not turn in uncompleted task.
  • Resourceful: Able to find quick and efficient ways to overcome obstacles.

Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Caile Spear, Boise State University. Student generated.

Intro: Rate the performance of yourself and each of your team members using the five-point scale below, from ‘Never’ to ‘Always’. Please be conservative using the endpoints ‘1=Never’ and ‘5=Always’. These should only be used if the person in fact Never or Always displays the description as written.

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • Communication: Communicates regularly and timely, Shares ideas, Participates in discussions, Updates team on work in process.
  • Reliable: Completes tasks on time, Follows through on task assignments, Works toward goal completion with care and diligence.
  • Respect: Respectfully listens to others and is open to different ideas, Takes turns talking, Treats people the way you want to be treated.
  • Quality Work: Performs consistent high quality work to the best of their ability, Does not turn in uncompleted work, Reviews and edits their work before submitting.
  • Takes initiative/Team Player: Volunteers to take on tasks, Actively participates, Takes on their share of the work assignment, Helps others when needed, Motivated.
  • Attends team meetings: Consistently attends meetings, Shows up on time, Is prepared for the meeting.
  • Professional: Actively engages with team members, Finds efficient ways to overcome obstacles, Manages time effectively, Encourages others, Demonstrates commitment to team.
  • Review/Feedback: Takes on reviewing and peer editing tasks for the team, Provides constructive feedback to the team and members to help improve

Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Claire Xiong, Boise State University. Student generated.

Intro: Please thoughtfully rate your perception of each member of your learning group, including yourself, on each the following items.

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • Used the experience cube- “I” O/T/F/W
  • Created a positive work environment
  • Cared about others’ subjective truth
  • Appeared committed to learning by taking risks and trying new things
  • Attempted to maximize each session

Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Heidi Reeder, Boise State University. 

Team Question Sets

Intro: Highly successful teams tend to apply practices that include open communications, shared efforts, consciously improving team processes, in addition to paying attention to tasks, requirements and deadlines. However, developing these practices often takes effort and time. Please consider the extent to which your team does the following:

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • My team members help one another as needed.
  • My team members really listen to each other when exchanging ideas.
  • My team effectively resolves disagreements.
  • My team stays focused.
  • My team plans and tracks the work that needs to be done.
  • All team members tend to share in the team’s work.
  • My team actively discusses how it works to try to improve its processes.
  • My team does not wait until the deadline to complete its work.

Source: * Source unknown

Intro: Please mark how satisfied you are with your experience in this team.

Scale: 1-5   Very Unsatisfied…Somewhat Satisfied…Very Satisfied

  • Overall, how satisfied are you with your team experience in this class.

Source: * Source unknown

Intro: You can improve your team processes by being conscious of how you work as a team, and taking time together to determine how to improve. Please consider your team strengths and weaknesses below, then suggest some specific actions it might take to improve.

Open Ended

  • Considering how your team works together, what things does your team do particularly well?
  • All teams experience some difficulties. What particular challenges has your team recently faced?
  • Considering how your team works together, what things does your team need to improve?

Source: * Questions contributed by Dr. Rob Anson, Boise State University.

Intro: Below is a list of problem habits many groups face. Consider the extent to which your team exhibits these behaviors. The higher the score, the more challenges your team is facing, and the more need there is for the team to take a focused look at its processes.

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • Team meetings generally begin 5-15 minutes late
  • Members often arrive late, leave early, or never even show up for the meetings.
  • No agenda exists—members simply have a vague notion of what they want to accomplish.
  • One or two members monopolize discussion throughout the meeting.
  • Members have not read the assignment, performed the necessary background research, or done what they were expected to do. Consequently, individuals are poorly prepared for the meeting
  • With words or by appearance, some members clearly convey that they would rather be elsewhere.
  • Members constantly interrupt each other or talk in pairs without listening to the individual who has the floor.
  • Issues never get resolved, only put on the back burner until next time.
  • No follow-up action plan is developed. Members are confused with regard to what the next step is and who is responsible for performing it.
  • The same individual or individuals end up doing the majority of the work.
  • Assignments are not completed on time or are completed poorly.

Source: * Adapted from Barbara Oakley, Richard M. Felder, Rebecca Brent, and Imad Elhajj, Turning Student Groups into Effective Teams, 2004, Journal of Student Centered Learning, Vol 2, No. 1, pp. 9-34, New Forums Press, OK. Oakley et al adapted from Jack McGourty and Kenneth P. De Meuse, The Team Developer: An Assessment and Skill Building Program, 2001, John Wiley & Sons, New York.

Intro: Please mark how satisfied you have been with both teams you experienced in this class.

Scale: 1-5   Very Unsatisfied…Somewhat Satisfied…Very Satisfied

  • Considering your CURRENT team in this class, how satisfied are you overall with your current team experience.
  • Considering your PRIOR team in this class, how satisfied were you overall with your prior team experience.

Source: * Questions contributed by Dr. Rob Anson, Boise State University. Adapted from R. M. Felder & R. Brent, Effective Teaching, North Carolina State University, 2000.

Intro: You can improve your team processes by being conscious of how you work as a team, and taking time together to plan how to improve. Please suggest some specific actions your team might take to improve.

Open Ended

  • Considering how your team is working, what are 2-3 specific changes your team could make to improve?

* Questions contributed by Dr. Rob Anson, Boise State University. Source unknown.

Intro:  Consider how your team worked during this last sprint to answer the following questions.

Questions: Open Ended

  • What did we do well?
  • What did we learn?
  • What still puzzles us?
  • What should we do differently next time?

* Designed for Agile Team Sprint Retrospective sessions.
Source: Questions adapted from Ken Schwaber (2004) “Agile Project Management with Scrum”

Intro: Please reflect on your individual experience in this past sprint. Everyone’s responses will be anonymously displayed to these questions.

Questions: Open Ended

  • How long did it take me to complete my tasks?
  • How accurate were my time estimates?
  • How often did I encounter any impediments (blockers or issues)

* Designed for Agile Team Sprint Retrospective sessions.
Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Daniel Rush, Boise State University.

Intro: Reflect on the ScrumMaster’s peer-leadership during this past sprint. Please answer these questions, which are based on the ScrumMaster duties listed in the PMI’s Agile Practice Guide (p. 154). Your answers will be aggregated with the rest of the team’s answers and shared with the ScrumMaster.

Everyone will answer these, from your individual perspectives. Please make your comments refer neutrally to “The SM …” or “They …”. Do not use their name, or “I”, “He or She”

Questions: Open Ended

  • Who was the Scrum Master this sprint? (enter name of Scrum Master on this question only)
  • How did the Scrum Master remove obstacles/impediments that were encountered? How effective were they?
  • In what ways did the Scrum Master facilitate information radiation? How effective were they?
  • What things do I want the next Scrum Master to continue?
  • What things do I want the next Scrum Master to change?

* Designed for Agile Team Sprint Retrospective sessions.
Source: Adapted from the PMI’s Agile Practice Guide (p. 154)

Intro:  Please answer the five questions below with complete honesty. This information will be compiled for your team and reported anonymously. These questions represent the five pillars of team effectiveness as determined through extensive research on teams. Teams at Google take these questions in order to better understand how they need to work on improving.

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • If I make a mistake on our team, it is not held against me.  
  • When my teammates say they’ll do something, they follow through with it.
  • Our team has an effective decision-making process.
  • The work I do for our team is meaningful to me.
  • I understand how our team’s work contributes to the organization’s goals.

These questions were created at Google for teams to take and discuss the results. Each question addresses one of the five pillars of team effectiveness. Please see the Resource Library at PeerAssessment.Com for more information about addressing each pillar.

These pillars include:
• Psychological safety – “If I make a mistake on our team, it is not held against me.”
• Dependability – “When my teammates say they’ll do something, they follow through with it.”
• Structure and Clarity – “Our team has an effective decision-making process.”
• Meaning – “The work I do for our team is meaningful to me.”
• Impact – “I understand how our team’s work contributes to the organization’s goals.”

Source: * re:Work (NA) Tool: Help teams determine their own needs. Accessed on 1/24/2020 from https://rework.withgoogle.com/guides/understanding-team-effectiveness/steps/help-teams-determine-their-needs/

Intro: These questions are about your team culture. Please answer each question in terms of how well it characterizes how your team works.

Questions:  Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • When my team faces setbacks, we apply more effort or find a new strategy.
  • My team sees mistakes as learning opportunities.
  • My team seeks out and listens to feedback.
  • When my team faces setbacks, we apply more effort or find a new strategy.
  • My team actively uses strategies to improve.
  • My team asks questions to drive our learning forward.
  • My team is willing to take risks and try new things.

* Carol Dweck, in her book “Mindset: The New Psychology of Success” identified two mindsets that help explain how students see themselves as learners and influence how they behave as learners. With a Fixed Mindset, people believe their basic qualities such as intelligence or talent, are fixed entities that they can’t change. With a Growth Mindset, people believe that their intelligence, talents and abilities can be developed through persistence, effort and hard work. Many have applied these mindsets to the team level.

Source: Questions are adapted from Mandi Dimitriadis. (NA) 10 Growth Mindset Questions To Ask Students. Makers Empire Accessed on 1/24/2020 from https://www.makersempire.com/promoting-growth-mindsets-with-makers-empire/

Intro: The following questions describe how welcoming and inclusive your team is to you and to the other team members. Please consider and respond to each question separately on the 1 to 5 scale. Use 1 if you Never experience, a 5 if you Always do, and a 2 – 4 if you experience it less or more often.  ** NOTE: Responses to this question will be shared only with your instructor, NOT with your teammates. **

Questions:  Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • I feel like I belong in my team.
  • I can voice a contrary opinion without fear of negative consequences.
  • Perspectives like mine are included in decision making.
  • My team values and respects all of the team members.
  • My team believes that people can greatly improve their talents and abilities.
  • My team fairly divides up the tasks that must be completed.
  • I attend to other’s reactions, needs and feelings, and adapt my behavior in response.
  • I act responsibly and consistently with the interests of the team in mind.

* Responses from these questions will NOT be shared directly with your students. You may chose to do so by summarizing the responses found in the Instructor Report.
* These questions were designed to address the 2019-2020 changes to ABET Accreditation student outcome criterion (5). “An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives”.
* These questions were adapted from Steven Huang, Head of Diversity and Inclusion at Culture Amp. https://www.cultureamp.com/blog/5-diversity-and-inclusion-questions-to-use-at-your-company/

These questions are designed for Workplace use

Intro: Suggest further changes, at the team level, based on the questions asked below.

Questions: Open Ended

  • What can the project manager do to improve project implementation preparedness and execution?
  • What is one thing you would like to see has changed six months from now?

* Source: Kenny Rencher, Fishers Technologies.

These questions are designed for Workplace use

Intro: The following questions are related to your team’s work with other teams.

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • My team communicates effectively to other teams and enables other teams to improve their performance.

* Source: Kenny Rencher, Fishers Technologies.

Other Question Sets

Intro: The following questions describe how welcoming and inclusive your team is to you and to the other team members. Please consider and respond to each question separately on the 1 to 5 scale. Use 1 if you Never experience, a 5 if you Always do, and a 2 – 4 if you experience it less or more often.  ** NOTE: Responses to this question will be shared only with your instructor, NOT with your teammates. **

Questions:  Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • I feel like I belong in my team.
  • I can voice a contrary opinion without fear of negative consequences.
  • Perspectives like mine are included in decision making.
  • My team values and respects all of the team members.
  • My team believes that people can greatly improve their talents and abilities.
  • My team fairly divides up the tasks that must be completed.
  • I attend to other’s reactions, needs and feelings, and adapt my behavior in response.
  • I act responsibly and consistently with the interests of the team in mind.

* Responses from these questions will NOT be shared directly with your students. You may chose to do so by summarizing the responses found in the Instructor Report.
* These questions were designed to address the 2019-2020 changes to ABET Accreditation student outcome criterion (5). “An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives”.
* These questions were adapted from Steven Huang, Head of Diversity and Inclusion at Culture Amp. https://www.cultureamp.com/blog/5-diversity-and-inclusion-questions-to-use-at-your-company/
– Questions 1-3 address a team member’s feeling that they belong, can speak up, can be a part of decisions.
– Question 4 was added to this set from inclusion question lists.
– Question 5 measures the “Growth Mindset”.
– Question 6 represents team organization and fairness.
– Questions 7-8 address how a team member relates to their team.

Intro: Please answer the following questions regarding the results you received from prior peer assessment(s) in this class. Your responses will be used to improve this process.

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • Did you read results from prior peer assessment(s) in this class?
  • Did you discuss results from the assessment(s) with your other team members?
  • Were your self ratings and comments consistent with those from your peer team members?
  • Were your contributions to the team fairly and accurately assessed by your peers?
  • Was the feedback useful for you to identify changes to how you could work with your team more effectively?

Source: Adapted from Mark Freeman and Jo McKenzie, SPARK, A confidential web-based template for self and peer assessment of student teamwork: benefits of evaluating across different subjects, 2002, British Journal of Educational Technology, Vol 33, No 5, pp 551-569, Blackwell Publishers Ltd, Massachusetts.

Intro: Please give your feedback regarding this peer assessment and its effectiveness.  You may also wish to make suggestions, or share concerns or questions.

Open Ended

  • Please comment on the peer assessment process, or results.

Source: Adapted from Mark Freeman and Jo McKenzie, SPARK, A confidential web-based template for self and peer assessment of student teamwork: benefits of evaluating across different subjects, 2002, British Journal of Educational Technology, Vol 33, No 5, pp 551-569, Blackwell Publishers Ltd, Massachusetts.

Intro: The results for this question will only be shared with your instructor.

Open Ended

  • Please include any additional confidential comments about your team on this assignment? Are there any issues you wish to report?

Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Rob Anson, Boise State University.

Intro: The results for this question will only be shared with your instructor.

Scale: Open Ended

  • Please comment on the Project as a learning experience.  Please note aspects that promoted learning and/or aspects that were not constructive.

Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Rob Anson, Boise State University.

Intro: These questions will only be shared with the instructor–they will not be seen by others on your team.

Open Ended

  • With whom on this team (if any) would you most like to work with on a team again? Why?
  • With whom on this team (if any) would you prefer not to work with on a team again? Why?

Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Rob Anson, Boise State University.

Intro: Please discuss any further issues. Your responses will only be seen by the instructor; they will not be shared with your team members.

Open Ended

  • Do you have other comments to share with your instructor?

Source: Questions contributed by Dr. Rob Anson, Boise State University.

These questions are designed for the Workplace

Intro: No one has a more immediate impact on employee engagement, productivity, and workplace satisfaction than direct managers of staff. Yet, most performance evaluation models are top-down—employees receive feedback from the people they report to, but managers rarely receive feedback from the people they manage. Please consider the extent to which your manager does the following:

Scale: 1-5   Never…Sometimes…Always

  • Research indicates “great” managers listen well, motivate others, and consistently make good decisions. My manager demonstrates these traits.
  • Research indicates “great” managers are passionate about their work and compassionate toward others. My manager demonstrates these traits.
  • I receive an adequate level of feedback from my manager about my work performance?
  • My manager has a solid grasp on the business as a whole beyond just his or her role or department.
  • My manager communicates individual and team objectives clearly.
  • My manager effectively communicates expectations so that I clearly understand what is expected of me from his/her point of view.
  • My manager gives me actionable feedback that helps me improve my performance.
  • My manager does not “micromanage” my work (i.e., get involved in details that are my responsibility).
  • My manager’s actions show that he/she values the perspective I bring to the team, even when it is different from his/her own.
  • My manager keeps the team focused on our priority results/deliverables.
  • My manager regularly shares relevant information from his/her manager and senior leaders.
  • My manager has had a meaningful discussion with me about career development in the past six months.
  • My manager communicates clear goals for our team.
  • My manager has the technical expertise (e.g., coding in Tech, selling in Global Business, accounting in Finance) required to effectively manage me.
  • I would recommend my manager to others.

* Source: Kenny Rencher, Fishers Technologies.

These questions are designed for the Workplace

Intro: <<Your manager will only be able to view responses to these questions anonymously–as aggregated results.>>
Please provide feedback to the following questions.

Open Ended

  • What would you recommend your manager keep doing?
  • What would you recommend your manager change about his or her approach to management?
  • What could your manager do to make your work experience more meaningful for you personally?

* Source: Kenny Rencher, Fishers Technologies.

These questions are designed for Workplace use

Intro: <<Your manager will only be able to view responses to these questions anonymously–as aggregated results.>> Please mark how satistified you are with your manager’s performance.

Scale: 1-5 Very Unsatisfied…Somewhat Satisfied…Very Satisfied

  • Overall, how satisfied are you with your manager’s overall performance as a manager.

* Source: Kenny Rencher, Fishers Technologies.